We’ve all seen it before. Requirements, documentation and designs are behind schedule. It takes weeks – or sometimes months – for teams to put together exactly what they have been working on. You need development to start to meet specific timelines, but the teams haven’t delivered.

What went wrong?

Probably nothing. There are competing priorities for people’s time. Status meetings, standups, governance, other projects and normal distractions of the office place get in the way. These aren’t excuses, just reasons why teams don’t deliver on time.

Is there a better way? Teams that hyperfocus on tasks – especially requirements – have a higher chance of succeeding: not just on time but ahead of schedule.

When I was consulting for a Fortune 100 client, the team I was working with kept seeing delays in business, UX and technical requirements. Based on certain estimates, it could take months just to define a mid-size project. I thought it was absurd! It turned out, teams were pulled in too many directions and weren’t focused.

We came up with a solution that has morphed in to Hyperfocused Product Requirements. The framework is simple: gather the right people, follow a strict timetable and deploy a flexible framework.

Get the business lead, a technical architect and some designers and analysts in a room together. Make sure these people have the ability and authority to make actual decisions. They shouldn’t have to go back and discuss with a steering group, 3 status meetings and a committee to decide on a user flow.

Timebox each activity so that everyone stays on task. Schedule in breaks and table anything that does not explicitly help reach the goal. Determine a level of detail and quality you are comfortable with before the session starts.

Start with a few questions: In 10 words or less, what are we building? What will this product do? How will customers benefit from this? In what ways will they realize the benefit? Then list out each step, task or feature of each answer. You can use classic requirements templates like “As a x, I must/should/would like to y so that I can z”.

Won’t this take time away from status meetings, updates, standups, governance and other projects? Yes. That is the point. If you get the right people together with a task, deadline and framework you will absolutely accomplish what you set out to accomplish.

The goal is to produce good work, not make excuses.